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 TÍTULO DESCARGA ACCIONES
Ensuring lift safety
PDF document CELEX_32014L0033_ES_TXT.pdf
SUMMARY European Union (EU) law on the sale and putting into service of lifts and safety components for lifts has two key aims: i) to allow lifts and their safety components to be sold throughout the EU market; and ii) to ensure a high level of safety for lift users and maintenance staff. WHAT DOES THIS DIRECTIVE DO? The directive lays down uniform rules on the sale and putting into service of lifts and safety components for lifts. It applies to lifts that permanently serve buildings and constructions and that are intended for the transport of persons and goods. It does not apply to funicular railways, hoists and escalators or walkways. KEY POINTS The directive defines the responsibilities of manufacturers, importers and distributors in the context of the sale of lifts and safety components for lifts: all lifts and safety components on sale in the EU must bear the CE conformity marking to show that they meet all the essential safety requirements of EU legislation; before obtaining the CE marking, the manufacturer must conduct a safety and conformity assessment and establish technical documentation for its lifts and components; importers must check whether manufacturers have carried out conformity assessments correctly and inform the authority monitoring the safety if they consider that the lifts or components do not conform with the essential safety requirements; all necessary documentation must be recorded and kept for 10 years; documentation and safety information must be written in a language easily understood by end -users; manufacturers and importers must indicate their postal address on their safety components and lifts; manufacturers may use electronic means to demonstrate conformity. In addition, the directive specifies how national authorities who monitor safety must identify and prevent the import of dangerous safety components or lifts from non-EU countries. WHEN DOES THE DIRECTIVE APPLY? This directive applies from 18 April 2014. It repeals Directive 95/16/EC with effect from 20 April 2016.
Machines

Machinery safety
PDF document CELEX_32006L0042_ES_TXT.pdf
SUMMARY WHAT DOES THE DIRECTIVE DO? — It enables machinery that meets European health and safety requirements to be moved freely throughout the EU. This means that workers and the public are well protected when they use or come into contact with machinery. — It lays down both compulsory and voluntary standards. — It only applies to products when they are first placed on the EU market. — It helps the EU to be more innovative, efficient and competitive. KEY POINTS The directive covers machinery, interchangeable equipment, safety components, lifting accessories, chains, ropes and webbing, removable mechanical transmission devices and partly completed machinery. It does not cover other types of machinery, such as machinery used in fairgrounds, the nuclear industry, laboratories and mines or by the military or police. Manufacturers must: — carry out a risk assessment to identify which health and safety requirements apply to their machinery — keep the risk assessment in mind when designing and building their machinery — determine what limits there are on using the machinery — identify any possible hazards — assess the risk of their machinery causing severe injury or damage and take action to make their machinery safer — make sure that their machinery complies with the essential health and safety requirements listed in Annex I to the directive — provide a technical document confirming that the machinery meets the directive's requirements — make sure that they are applying conformity assessment procedures and that they are making all necessary information available, including instructions for assembly and use — check that they have filled in the EC declaration of conformity and that the CE conformity marking has been put on the machinery so that it can be used anywhere in the EU. WHEN DID THIS DIRECTIVE ENTER INTO FORCE? On 29 December 2009.
Machines

Cableway installations for passengers
PDF document CELEX_32016R0424_ES_TXT.pdf
SUMMARY OF: Regulation (EU) 2016/424 — cableway installations WHAT IS THE AIM OF THE REGULATION? It sets out rules on the essential safety requirements, design, construction and entry into service of new cableways carrying passengers. These ensure passenger safety and enable the equipment to be sold and used throughout the EU. The regulation replaces Directive 2000/9/EC. KEY POINTS The legislation applies to new cableway installations*, to modifications to existing cableway installations which require authorisation and to subsystems* and safety components* for cableways installations. They must all meet the essential safety requirements contained in Annex II of the regulation. Annex II contains essential requirements that cover all aspects of cableway installations, including maintenance and operability, ranging from dimensions and assembly to towing and control devices. The national person or authority responsible for cableway installations must carry out a comprehensive safety analysis of each planned installation and include the results in a safety report. EU countries must: ensure no operating cableway installation is liable to endanger the health or safety of people or property when they are properly installed, maintained and operated according to their intended purpose; set procedures for authorising the construction and entry into service of cableways installations under their jurisdiction; allow cableway installations to remain in operation only if they comply with the conditions in the safety report. Manufacturers of subsystems and safety components must: ensure these are designed and made according to the essential requirements set out in Annex II; keep technical documentation and the EU declaration of conformity for 30 years; give them an identifiable type, batch or serial number; indicate their contact details; provide easily understandable use and safety information; inform national authorities immediately if a subsystem or safety component presents a risk. Obligations are placed on importers and distributors to ensure that the subsystems or safety components satisfy the essential requirements. EU countries inform the European Commission of the various bodies which are authorised to carry out the conformity assessment tests. The Commission organises exchange of experience between national authorities. EU countries must have penalties in place for any violations of the law by 21 March 2018. The legislation does not apply to: lifts covered by separate EU legislation (Directive 2014/33/EU); pre-1 January 1986 cableways still operating and considered to be of historic, cultural or heritage interest, that have not had not any significant changes in design or construction, including subsystems and safety components specifically designed for them; installations used for agricultural or forestry purposes; cableways transporting goods and specifically designated people to mountain shelters and huts; leisure equipment in fairgrounds and amusement parks; mining and industrial installations; waterborne installations. FROM WHEN DOES THE REGULATION APPLY? It applies from 21 April 2018, apart from certain articles dealing largely with notification bodies and procedures. These apply from 21 October 2016.
Machines

Ensuring safe personal protective equipment for users
PDF document CELEX_32016R0425_ES_TXT.pdf
SUMMARY OF: Regulation (EU) 2016/425 — safe personal protective equipment WHAT IS THE AIM OF THE REGULATION? It lays down requirements for the design and manufacture of personal protective equipment* (PPE). These aim to ensure the health and safety of users and to allow the equipment to be sold and used throughout the European Union (EU). It replaces earlier legislation (Council Directive 89/686/EEC). KEY POINTS Personal protective equipment may only be sold and used if it: complies with the regulation, when properly maintained and used for its intended purpose, especially the Annex II setting out the essential health and safety requirements; does not endanger the health or safety of people, pets or property. Manufacturers must: ensure PPE items are designed and made according to the legislation; subject each PPE to the relevant conformity assessment procedure; keep relevant technical documentation and the EU conformity declaration for 10 years; carry out sample testing of PPE and, if necessary, keep a register of complaints, non-conforming PPE and PPE recalls; give details, such as the registered trade name and their postal address, on PPE packaging or accompanying documents; provide easily understood instructions for use and safety instructions; inform national authorities immediately where the PPE presents a risk. Obligations are placed on importers and distributors to ensure that the PPE satisfies the EU’s standards. Different conformity assessment procedures are carried out by national conformity assessment bodies depending on which of the 3 categories of risk the PPE is intended to protect users against: category I — minimal risks; category II — risks not included in categories I or III; category III — very serious risks such as death or irreversible damage to health. EU countries inform the European Commission of the various bodies which are authorised to carry out the conformity assessment tests. The Commission organises exchange of experience between national authorities. The legislation does not apply to personal protective equipment used: by the armed forces or for the maintenance of law and order; for self-defence, except for sporting activities; privately to protect against weather conditions that are not extreme; damp and water during dishwashing; on seagoing vessels or aircraft subject to the relevant international treaties; by drivers and passengers of motorcycles and mopeds (protective helmets and visors). EU countries must have penalties in place for any violations of the law by 21 March 2018. FROM WHEN DOES THE REGULATION APPLY? It applies from 21 April 2018, apart from certain articles dealing largely with notification bodies and procedures. These apply from 21 October 2016. BACKGROUND For more information, see: ‘Personal protective equipment (PPE)’ on the European Commission's website. Following the COVID-19 outbreak and introducing measures to cope with the impact of the crisis, the European Commission adopted: Commission Recommendation (EU) 2020/403 of 13 March 2020 on conformity assessment and market surveillance procedures within the context of the COVID-19 threat Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2020/668 of 18 May 2020 on the harmonised standards for personal protective equipment drafted in support of Regulation (EU) 2016/425 of the European Parliament and of the Council
Machines

Equipment used in potentially explosive atmospheres (ATEX)
PDF document CELEX_32014L0034_ES_TXT.pdf
SUMMARY WHAT DOES THIS DIRECTIVE DO? The ATEX directive lays down uniform, EU-wide rules on the sale and putting into service of equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres. It seeks to ensure that products fulfil certain requirements to ensure a high level of protection of the health and safety of persons, especially workers, and, where appropriate, the protection of domestic animals and property. It applies to a wide range of products, including equipment used on fixed offshore oil and gas platforms, in petrochemical plants, mines, flour mills (airborne flour particles are highly flammable) and other areas where a potentially explosive atmosphere may be present. KEY POINTS The directive defines the responsibilities of manufacturers, importers and distributors in the context of the sale of equipment and protective systems for use in potentially explosive atmospheres. All products on sale in the EU must bear the CE conformity marking to show that they meet all the essential safety requirements of EU legislation. Before obtaining the CE marking, the manufacturer must conduct a safety and conformity assessment and establish technical documentation for products. Importers must check that manufacturers have carried out conformity assessments correctly. Where this is not the case, they must inform the safety monitoring authority. All necessary documentation must be recorded and kept for 10 years. Documentation and safety information must be written in a language easily understood by end -users. Manufacturers and importers must indicate their postal address on their products. Manufacturers may use electronic means to provide the safety monitoring authorities with the information that is necessary to demonstrate a product’s conformity. In addition, the directive specifies the steps to be taken by national authorities that monitor safety to identify and prevent the import of dangerous products from non-EU countries. WHEN DOES THE DIRECTIVE APPLY? From 20 April 2016. It repeals Directive 94/9/EC with effect from 20 April 2016. BACKGROUND The directive updates EU rules on the sale of equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres. This is part of the effort to modernise European law in a wide variety of industrial sectors so as to simplify the rules, reduce administrative burdens and establish clearer and more consistent rules. See also the European Commission’s ATEX website.
Machines

Fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamps — ecodesign requirements
PDF document Reglamento CE 245-2009.pdf
SUMMARY OF: Regulation (EC) No 245/2009 — ecodesign requirements for fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamps WHAT IS THE AIM OF THE REGULATION? It lays down the ecodesign rules applicable to certain types of lamps to be used for general lighting with a view to reducing their environmental impact. KEY POINTS The regulation applies specifically to: fluorescent lamps without integrated ballast*; high intensity discharge lamps*; ballasts* and luminaires* able to operate such lamps. Ecodesign requirements This regulation defines ecodesign requirements in 6 progressive stages (the last remaining stage will apply from 2018) each representing a gradual increase in the targets and/or extending the scope of the requirements to new sub-categories of products. These requirements concern: lamps — they must meet efficacy, performance and information requirements. Different types of lamps must reach a certain luminous efficacy in each wattage category, and meet lamp life and lamp lumen maintenance requirements. Manufacturers must also provide information on number of elements including: the wattage (the amount of energy required to light a bulb); lamp lumen (the amount of light produced by a bulb); efficacy; maintenance factor; mercury content; and colour temperature of the lamps. ballasts — they must meet energy performance and information requirements. When the lamps are switched on, the ballasts must comply with minimum efficacy thresholds. Manufacturers of ballasts must provide information on the energy efficiency index of products. luminaires — they must meet energy performance, compatibility and information requirements. The power consumption of luminaires must not exceed that of the incorporated ballasts when they do not emit any light. Manufacturers of luminaires must provide information on the efficiency of all ballasts and lamps sold with a luminaire, as well as maintenance and disassembly instructions. Conformity Manufacturers or their representatives are required to carry out a conformity assessment before placing an energy-using product on the market. Verification procedures for market surveillance purposes National authorities of EU countries must apply market surveillance procedures regarding: lamps — tests are carried out on a sample batch of a minimum of 20 lamps of the same model from the same manufacturer. The average results must not vary from the limit, threshold or declared values by more than 10 %; ballasts and luminaires — tests are carried on 1 single unit. The results obtained must not exceed the limit values. Otherwise, 3 more units must be tested. FROM WHEN DOES THE REGULATION APPLY? It has applied since 13 April 2009. BACKGROUND For more information, see: ‘Lighting’ on the European Commission's website. * KEY TERMS Fluorescent lamps without integrated ballast: discharge lamps of the low-pressure mercury type in which most of the light is emitted through the excitement of the molecules of one or more layers of phosphors by ultraviolet radiation from the discharge. They may be single- or double-capped and are without integrated ballast. High intensity discharge lamps: lamps in which the light is produced, directly or indirectly, by an electric discharge through a gas, a metal vapour or a mixture of several gases and vapours, and in which the light-producing arc is stabilised by wall temperature and the arc has a bulb wall loading in excess of 3 watts per square centimetre. Ballasts: devices which serve mainly to limit the current of the lamp(s) to the required value. Luminaires: pieces of apparatus which distribute, filter or transform the light transmitted from one or more light sources and which include all the parts necessary for supporting, fixing and protecting the light sources. MAIN DOCUMENT Commission Regulation (EC) No 245/2009 of 18 March 2009 implementing Directive 2005/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council with regard to ecodesign requirements for fluorescent lamps without integrated ballast, for high intensity discharge lamps, and for ballasts and luminaires able to operate such lamps, and repealing Directive 2000/55/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council (OJ L 76, 24.3.2009, pp. 17-44) The successive amendments and corrections to Regulation (EC) No 245/2009 have been incorporated into the basic text. This consolidated version is of documentary value only. RELATED DOCUMENTS Directive 2009/125/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 October 2009 establishing a framework for the setting of ecodesign requirements for energy-related products (OJ L 285, 31.10.2009, pp. 10-35) See consolidated version
Electrical and electronic equipment and gas appliances

Reducing interference between electrical and electronic devices
PDF document Directiva 2014-30-UE en materia de compatibilidad electromagnética.pdf
SUMMARY OF: Directive 2014/30/EU on electromagnetic compatibility SUMMARY WHAT DOES THIS DIRECTIVE DO? — It aims to ensure that electrical and electronic equipment complies with an adequate level of electromagnetic compatibility. — It lays down uniform rules to ensure protection against electromagnetic disturbance so as to guarantee the free movement of electrical and electronic equipment within the EU’s internal market. — The equipment covered by this directive includes both apparatus and fixed installations. — It does not apply to: — radio and telecommunications terminal equipment; — aircraft or equipment intended to be fitted in aircraft; — custom-built evaluation kits for professional use at research and development facilities; — radio equipment used by radio amateurs, unless the equipment is made available on the market. KEY POINTS The directive defines the responsibilities of manufacturers, importers and distributors in regard to the sale of electromagnetic equipment. — All apparatus on sale in the EU must bear the CE conformity marking to show it meets all the essential requirements of EU legislation. — Before obtaining the CE marking, the manufacturer must conduct a conformity assessment and establish the technical documentation for the equipment. Equipment placed on the market for incorporation into a given fixed installation is exempt from this assessment. — Importers must check whether manufacturers have carried out conformity assessments correctly and inform the national body responsible for market surveillance if they consider that equipment does not conform with the essential requirements. — All necessary documentation must be kept for 10 years. — Manufacturers may use electronic means to demonstrate conformity in a language easily understood by the competent national authority. — Manufacturers and importers must indicate their postal address on the apparatus. In addition, the directive specifies how national authorities must identify apparatus which is not in conformity with the essential requirements and prevent it from being put on the market. WHEN DOES THE DIRECTIVE APPLY? This directive entered into force on 18 April 2014 and is applicable from 20 April 2016. It repeals Directive 2004/108/EC. BACKGROUND The directive updates EU rules on placing electromagnetic equipment on the market. This is part of the effort to modernise EU law in a wide variety of industrial sectors so as to simplify the rules, reduce administrative burdens and establish clearer and more consistent rules. — Electromagnetic compatibility ACT Directive 2014/30/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to electromagnetic compatibility (OJ L 96, 29.3.2014, pp. 79-106) RELATED ACT Directive 2004/108/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 December 2004 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to electromagnetic compatibility and repealing Directive 89/336/EEC (OJ L 390, 31.12.2004, pp. 24-37)
Electrical and electronic equipment and gas appliances

Appliances burning gaseous fuels (from 2018)
PDF document Reglamento UE 2016-426 sobre los aparatos que queman combustibles gaseosos.pdf
SUMMARY OF: Regulation (EU) 2016/426 on appliances burning gaseous fuels WHAT IS THE AIM OF THE REGULATION? It modifies and updates rules set out in earlier legislation (Directive 2009/142/EC). It establishes the rules for the placing on the market and putting into service of appliances burning gaseous fuels and their fittings. It provides access to the European Union (EU) market for the appliances and fittings covered as far as their gas safety is concerned. It deals with the energy efficiency of these products, unless other more specific EU legislation applies. KEY POINTS Scope The regulation applies to gas appliances and fittings where: ‘appliances’ are appliances burning gaseous fuels used for cooking, heating, hot water production, refrigeration, lighting or washing as well as forced draught burners* and heaters to be equipped with such burners; ‘fittings’ are safety devices, controlling devices or regulating devices and their parts, designed to be fitted into an appliance burning gaseous fuel or used to build such an appliance. The regulation does not apply to specially designed appliances for use: in industrial processes carried out on industrial premises; on aircraft and railways; or for temporary research purposes in laboratories. Conditions to be met when placing appliances or fittings on the market Appliances and fittings must comply with the regulation — whose essential requirements are set out in Annex I — before they can be placed on the market and put into service in the EU. Appliances covered by the regulation must be designed and built in such a way as to operate safely and present no danger to persons, domestic animals or property when used normally*. All appliances must be accompanied by: technical instructions for the installer, containing all the instructions for installation, adjustment and servicing required to ensure that those operations are correctly performed, and that the appliance may be used safely, including, for example details of the type of gas and supply pressure used the flow of fresh air required, as well as the conditions for the dispersal of combustion products; instructions for use and servicing intended for the user containing all the information required for safe use and drawing the user’s attention to any restrictions on use; warnings indicating the type of gas to be used, the gas supply pressure and any restrictions on use, in particular the restrictions on installing the appliance only in areas where there is sufficient ventilation. Type-examination The manufacturer must lodge an application for an EU type-examination with a single notified body*. This application must include: the manufacturer’s name and address; a written declaration that the application has not been lodged with any other notified body; technical documentation, as described in this regulation. Where the type satisfies the criteria laid down by this regulation, the notified body must issue an EU type-examination certificate to the applicant. EU declaration of conformity Before placing an appliance or a fitting type on the market, the manufacturer must subject it to a production phase surveillance by a notified body. After a successful conformity assessment of the product, the manufacturer must draw up an EU declaration of conformity* declaring that the product concerned conforms to the requirements of this regulation. The gas appliance or its data plate must bear the CE marking and the following information: the manufacturer’s name; registered trade name; appliance category; and the gas supply pressure; the last two digits of the year in which the ‘CE’ marking was added. Manufacturers must keep relevant technical documentation and the EU declaration of conformity for 10 years after the placing on the market of the appliance/fitting; inform national authorities of any appliance that might pose a risk. Importers must ensure that appliances and fittings that they place on the market comply with this regulation, including that conformity assessment procedures have been carried out and that the CE marking and documentation drawn up by manufacturers are available for inspection by the authorities. Their name and contact details should be indicated on the appliance or fitting. Distributors must ensure they act with due care to ensure that their handling of an appliance or fitting does not affect its compliance; verify that any appliance they make available on the market bears the CE marking and is accompanied by a declaration of conformity EU governments inform the European Commission of the notified bodies which are authorised to carry out the conformity assessment tasks. The Commission coordinates the mutual collaboration between national authorities. EU countries must inform the Commission of the types of gas and corresponding supply pressures used on their territory by 21 October 2017. They must also notify any subsequent changes in these conditions in advance. EU countries must have penalties in place for any violations of the law by 21 March 2018. FROM WHEN DOES THE REGULATION APPLY? It applies from 21 April 2018, apart from certain articles dealing largely with notification bodies and procedures, as well as the notification of the types of gas and corresponding supply pressures used on EU countries’ territories. These apply from 21 October 2016. BACKGROUND For more information, see: ‘Gas appliances’ on the European Commission's website. * KEY TERMS Forced draught burner: the air is brought into the head of the burner by means of a forced draught blower or fan. Normal use: considered to be when an appliance is: correctly installed and regularly serviced according to the manufacturer’s instructions; used with a normal variation in the gas quality and a normal fluctuation in the supply pressure; used in accordance with its intended purpose or in a way which can be reasonably expected. Notified body: It assesses conformity under the conditions laid down by EU regulations. This is a service offered to manufacturers in the public interest. EU declaration of conformity to type: a manufacturer declares that the appliances conform with the type as described in the EU type-examination certificate and satisfy the essential requirements of this regulation (CE marking). MAIN DOCUMENT Regulation (EU) 2016/426 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 March 2016 on appliances burning gaseous fuels and repealing Directive 2009/142/EC (OJ L 81, 31.3.2016, pp. 99–147) RELATED DOCUMENTS Directive 2009/142/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 November 2009 relating to appliances burning gaseous fuels (OJ L 330, 16.12.2009, pp. 10–27)
Electrical and electronic equipment and gas appliances

Electrical safety: low-voltage electrical equipment
PDF document Directiva 2014-35-UE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo, de 26 de febrero de 2014.pdf
European Union policy on the sale of electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits aims to ensure high levels of protection of health and safety of persons, and of domestic animals and property. ACT Directive 2014/35/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to the making available on the market of electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits. SUMMARY European Union policy on the sale of electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits aims to ensure high levels of protection of health and safety of persons, and of domestic animals and property. WHAT DOES THIS DIRECTIVE DO? The directive creates uniform conditions throughout the EU for the sale of electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits. It applies to electrical equipment designed for use with a voltage rating of between 50 and 1 000 V for alternating current and between 75 and 1 500 V for direct current. It covers all health and safety risks, thus ensuring that electrical equipment is used safely and for the applications for which it was made. KEY POINTS The directive lays down the responsibilities of manufacturers, importers and distributors in regard to the sale of electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits: all electrical equipment on sale in the EU must bear the CE conformity marking to show it meets all the essential safety requirements of EU legislation; before obtaining the CE marking, the manufacturer must conduct a safety and conformity assessment, establish the technical documentation demonstrating the compliance of the equipment and issue and sign a EU declaration of conformity; importers must check whether manufacturers have carried out the conformity assessment procedure correctly and inform the authority monitoring safety if they consider that equipment does not conform to the essential safety requirements; the EU declaration of conformity and the technical documentation must be kept for 10 years; instructions and safety information must be written in a language easily understood by end users as determined by the national authority concerned; manufacturers and importers must indicate their contact details on their electrical equipment; In addition, the directive specifies the steps to be taken by national authorities who monitor safety to identify and prevent the sale of dangerous electrical equipment in the EU. WHEN DOES THE DIRECTIVE APPLY? This directive applies from 20 April 2016. It repeals Directive 2006/95/EC with effect from 20 April 2016. BACKGROUND The directive updates EU rules for the sale of electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits. This is part of the effort to modernise EU law in a wide variety of industrial sectors in order to reduce administrative burdens and to establish clearer and more consistent rules. Further information is available on the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs website.
Electrical and electronic equipment and gas appliances

Efficient and safe hot-water boilers
PDF document Directiva 92-42-CEE relativa a los requisitos de rendimiento para las calderas nuevas de agua caliente alimentadas con combustibles líquidos o gaseosos.pdf
SUMMARY OF: Directive 92/42/EEC on efficiency requirements for new hot-water boilers fired with liquid or gaseous fuels SUMMARY Hot-water boilers must meet the EU’s ecodesign requirements. WHAT DOES THE DIRECTIVE DO? It sets out the energy efficiency* requirements for new hot water heaters or ‘boilers’ fired by liquid or gaseous fuels. KEY POINTS The directive applies to boilers with an output of no less than 4 kW and no more than 400 kW, specifically: — standard boilers, — low-temperature boilers, — gas-condensing boilers. It does not apply to: — hot water boilers capable of being fired by different fuels including solid fuels, — equipment for instantly preparing hot water, — boilers designed to be fired by fuels other than the liquid and gaseous fuels commonly marketed, — cookers and appliances which supply hot water for central heating, and which supply sanitary hot water only as a secondary function, — appliances with outputs of less than 6 kW which use gravity circulation and are designed solely for the production of stored sanitary hot water, — boilers manufactured on a one-off basis — that is, produced once and therefore not manufactured as part of a series, — cogeneration units* (Directive 2004/8/EC). Standardisation and the ‘CE’ marking Any boiler manufactured in accordance with harmonised European standards should conform to the essential requirements set out in the directive. An assessment before affixing the CE conformity marking is carried out by: — bodies designated by EU countries in accordance with the minimum assessment criteria and notified to the Commission and the other EU countries, or — by the manufacturers themselves. Ecodesign — The directive is one of the measures implementing the Framework Directive 2009/125/EC on ecodesign, which set out efficiency requirements for individual product groups. It removes the option for EU countries to apply a specific labelling system to boilers which are more efficient than standard ones. Industry sectors can also make voluntary agreements to reduce the energy consumption of their products. The Commission formally approves these agreements and checks on their implementation. — The EU energy efficiency directive sets compulsory targets for EU countries in order to achieve a 20 % energy efficiency target by 2020. A series of energy efficiency regulations for boilers were published in 2013 as part of this policy. They set out minimum standards and an energy labelling scheme. — Regulation (EU) No 813/2013, which amends Directive 92/42/EEC, sets out the ecodesign requirements for space heaters* and combination heaters* which do not run on biomass and have an output of less than 400 kW. KEYWORDS * Energy efficiency: using less energy to provide the same service, i.e. less heating energy to maintain the same temperature. * Cogeneration: the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, both of which are used. * Space heater: a device, equipped with one or more heat generators, that provides heat to a water-based central heating system to keep an indoor space at an even temperature. * Combination heater: a space heater also designed to provide hot drinking or sanitary water which is connected to an external supply of drinking or sanitary water. For more information, see ‘Heaters’on the European Commission's website. ACT Council Directive 92/42/EEC of 21 May 1992 on efficiency requirements for new hot-water boilers fired with liquid or gaseous fuels
Electrical and electronic equipment and gas appliances